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Canine ABR Research Report


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Analysis of Canine Presbycusis Using
Otoacoustic Emission and Auditory Brainstem Response Testing

P.M. Scheifele and M.G. Pinto
Animal Science Department,
University of Connecticut,
Storrs CT 06269-4040

F.E. Musiek
Communications Science Department,
University of Connecticut,
Storrs, CT 06269-1085

J. Preece
Communications Science Department,
City University of New York,
New York, NY 10021

Deafness is not an uncommon issue in dogs. Congenital deafness has been reported for approximately 80 breeds. Equally prevalent, older dogs develop presbycusis (acquired deafness) at any time later in life. Most present studies of canine deafness using electrophysiological techniques focus specifically on confirming congenital deafness. In this study hearing of dogs was tested using Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) and Distortion Product Oto-Acoustic Emissions (DPOAE) tests to confirm presbycusis and assess the level of hearing loss. The subject dogs included one with known normal hearing, one congenitally deaf dog, and one dog with presbycusis. Hearing ability for each dog was based on clinical history of otology, behavioral impressions of hearing and age. DPOAEs were run to initially determine cochlear status. ABRs were run using a 100 µsec click stimulus at a repetition rate of 19.7 Hz at 90, 60 and 40 dB nHL. Based on the combined analysis of ABR and DPOAE differences in canine hearing of dogs with presbycusis and congenital deafness are evident. These results are continuing to be compared with those of other dogs of known otology and audiology in an effort to develop canine “norms” for ABR and to readily detect these pathologies in companion animals to assist veterinarians in the diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss in dogs.
PACS numbers: 43.80 Lb

I. INTRODUCTION

II. METHODS

III. RESULTS

IV. DISCUSSION

V. REFERENCES

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Original photographs courtesy of the Bioacoustics Laboratory UConn. Edited by Frances Foley.

Production, Graphics & Design by Frances Caprio Foley.
Noisemakers Productions. Copyright 2007.
Updated June 2007.